History of Argentine Tango


History of Argentine Tango

The precise origins of tango (the dance and the word itself) are lost in the time and an unrecorded history. Usually accepted the possibility is that in the mid- 1800s, many African slave were brought to Argentina and began to influence the local culture. In the 1890s, the word Tango began to be used in connection with the dance. The word "Tango" may be had African origin, meaning "closed place" or "reserved ground". Or it may be derived from Portuguese (and from the Latin verb tanguere, to touch) and was picked up by Africans. Whatever its source, the word "tango" acquired the real meaning of the place where African slaves and free blacks joined to dance.

Originally it was only one of the many dances. The tango was born in African- Argentine dance venues attended by compadritos. Compadritos were young men, principally native born and poor, who liked to dress in slouch hats, with tied neckerchiefs and high-heeled boots with knives tucked occasionally into their belts.
The tango soon became better known throughout society, as theatres and street barrel organs spread it from the suburbs to the working-class slums, which were crowded with hundreds of thousands of European immigrants. The music resulted from the fusion of different forms of music from Europe.

The Argentine Tango received the influenced by the Tango Habanera. The Tango Habanera came from two kind of Tango: the Milonga with its influence in the guajira flamenco and the Tango Andaluz or Tango flamenco. The tango of that time was very different to the Argentine Tango we know today. In the early 1900s, the tango came spread of the worldwide; the first European tango fad took place in Paris. Towards the end of 1913, the tango had become an international phenomenon in Paris, London and New York. Later in 1914 more genuine tango stylings were developed, along with some modifications like Albert Newman's "Minuet" Tango.

The Argentina had its Golden Age by the 1930s. The country became one of the ten richest nations in the world and music, poetry and culture prospered. The tango came to be an important expression of Argentine culture.

The requirement of going underground joint with the eventual incursion of rock and roll sent the tango into decline until the mid-1980s when the stage show Tango Argentino opened in Paris. Once again Paris was position zero for provoking tango excitement worldwide. The show toured the world and motivated a revival in Europe, North America and Japan that we are part of today.



A brief history of some styles of dance:

History of Argentine Tango
Breakdance History
Cha Cha Dance History
 History of Argentine Tango
The precise origins of tango are lost in the time and an unrecorded history.
 Breakdance History
Breakdance is a street dance style, this dance has hip hop dance.
 Cha Cha Dance History
The scraping and shuffling of the feet generate a sound that sounds like "Cha Cha Cha".
Flamenco Dance History
Foxtrot Dance History
History of Jazz Dance
 Flamenco Dance History
Appeared from the expression of a pursued people, the Gypsies of Southern Spain.
 Foxtrot Dance History
This dance was the most important development in all of ballroom dancing.
 History of Jazz Dance
The Jazz dance was originated from the African American vernacular dance.
History of Polka
History of Salsa
Samba History
 History of Polka
Polka is defined as a lively couple dance of Bohemian source in duple time.
 History of Salsa
Salsa refers to a combination of informal dance styles having origins the Caribbean.
 Samba History
It was and is danced as a festival dance throughout the street festivals.
Disco & Hustle History
History of Merengue
History of Waltz
 Disco & Hustle History
In the 1970s the Hustle originated among Hispanic Communities in New York City.
 History of Merengue
The Merengue is the national dance of the Dominican Republic.
 History of Waltz
The waltz was originated in the suburbs of Vienna and in the alpine region of Austria.