History Of Waltz


History Of Waltz

The waltz was originated in the suburbs of Vienna and in the alpine region of Austria, in the 17th century; waltzes were played in the ballrooms of the Hapsburg court. The German, folk dance, "Landler", is supposed to be the precursor of the Waltz. Throughout the 18th Century, a dance developed, which was called the waltzen, German for to roll, turn or slide.
When the Waltzen was introduced into the ballrooms of the world in the early 19th century, the older generation showed their indignation, because it was the first dance where the couple danced in an adapted closed position-with the man's hand around the waist of the girl.
Waltz became popular through many parts of Germany and Austria and much more when two great Austrian composers - Franz Lanner and Johann Strauss: they set the standard for the Viennese waltz (a very fast version of the Waltz), in 1830.

During the middle of the eighteenth century, the waltz was very popular in France. By the end of the eighteenth century, the high society accepted this old Austrian peasant dance, and three-quarter rhythm was here to stay.

Religious leaders almost collectively considered it as vulgar and sinful. Continental court circles were against the waltz. In England, the waltz was accepted more slowly, because it was a land of severe morals.

In 1834, Lorenzo Papanti (Boston dancing master) danced the waltz for the first time, in an exhibition in Mrs. Otis' Beacon Hill mansion, in the United States (Boston). Social leaders were astonished at what they called "an indecorous presentation." By the middle of the nineteenth century, the waltz was firmly established in United States society.

Fortunately, the aggressive disagreement faded out and the Waltz weathered an exciting and diverse career, rising today in two established forms, both reflecting the most important characteristics of the dance. They are known as the Modern Waltz and the Viennese (Quick) Waltz.

Actually, Waltz is popularly identified as the "traditional American wedding dance" and is often used for Father/Daughter and Mother/Son dances.

A brief history of some styles of dance:

History of Argentine Tango
Breakdance History
Cha Cha Dance History
 History of Argentine Tango
The precise origins of tango are lost in the time and an unrecorded history.
 Breakdance History
Breakdance is a street dance style, this dance has hip hop dance.
 Cha Cha Dance History
The scraping and shuffling of the feet generate a sound that sounds like "Cha Cha Cha".
Flamenco Dance History
Foxtrot Dance History
History of Jazz Dance
 Flamenco Dance History
Appeared from the expression of a pursued people, the Gypsies of Southern Spain.
 Foxtrot Dance History
This dance was the most important development in all of ballroom dancing.
 History of Jazz Dance
The Jazz dance was originated from the African American vernacular dance.
History of Polka
History of Salsa
Samba History
 History of Polka
Polka is defined as a lively couple dance of Bohemian source in duple time.
 History of Salsa
Salsa refers to a combination of informal dance styles having origins the Caribbean.
 Samba History
It was and is danced as a festival dance throughout the street festivals.
Disco & Hustle History
History of Merengue
History of Waltz
 Disco & Hustle History
In the 1970s the Hustle originated among Hispanic Communities in New York City.
 History of Merengue
The Merengue is the national dance of the Dominican Republic.
 History of Waltz
The waltz was originated in the suburbs of Vienna and in the alpine region of Austria.